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Comments on: IM Netspeak L33t Fiction http://writerresponsetheory.org/wordpress/2006/09/12/im-netspeak-l33t-fiction/ a blog and podcast dedicated to discussing text arts forms Sun, 19 Nov 2017 00:57:21 +0000 http://wordpress.org/?v=2.0.2 en Writer Response Theory 2004-2005 wrt@writerresponsetheory.org (Writer Response Theory) wrt@writerresponsetheory.org Talk Radio Comment-cast: IM Netspeak L33t Fiction Comment-cast: IM Netspeak L33t Fiction Writer Response Theory Writer Response Theory wrt@writerresponsetheory.org http://writerresponsetheory.org/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/iTWRT.JPG WRT: Writer Response Theory http://writerresponsetheory.org/wordpress 144 144 by: Jeremy Douglass http://writerresponsetheory.org/wordpress/2006/09/12/im-netspeak-l33t-fiction/#comment-125343 Wed, 10 Oct 2007 01:50:35 +0000 http://writerresponsetheory.org/wordpress/2006/09/12/im-netspeak-l33t-fiction/#comment-125343 Mark, I stumbled into talking about 1337 aesthetics in the middle of a symposium talk on password aesthetics this summer. That is, corporate-enforced password creation (required number and symbol mix-in) has a number of similar aesthetics to 1337, and it is interesting to think about why: 1337 aesthetics are particular and requires extra interpretation to process. This makes it hard for people who don't get it to read, which is why subcultures like it. It is also hard to remember, which is most why password users would rather not use it. Free letter-number and letter-symbol substitution combinatorially expands the possible number of ways of saying the same word, so a subculture discourse becomes less search-engine searchable: many people are spelling "owned" in a dozen or a hundred slightly different ways, occasionally using a consistent misspelling based on their specific message board / forum / niche. For an insular or underground subculture, this is a feature of 1337 - it opens up language to regional inflection and accent, which brings with it the potential for more shibboleth's that expose outsiders. For password memorizers, of course, tiny seemingly-insignificant variations in the basic sense of a word or phrase are pure poison - they exploit the gap between what a symbol string is remembered for (its sense) and what it actually is, leading to more forgetting and failure. I'll go on at some other time, but you get the idea. I think IM often gets represented purely as a kind of subversive misspelling, the way people discuss the politics of ebonics grammar patterns. Efficiency is also part of the picture, but I wonder whether or not privacy and security aren't at least as important - and in that sense, whether the culture of 13375p34&#124;< and corporate mainframe security best practices might be mirrors rather than antitheses. Deprecated: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/writerresponse/writerresponsetheory.org/wordpress/wp-includes/functions-formatting.php on line 76

Mark, I stumbled into talking about 1337 aesthetics in the middle of a symposium talk on password aesthetics this summer. That is, corporate-enforced password creation (required number and symbol mix-in) has a number of similar aesthetics to 1337, and it is interesting to think about why:

1337 aesthetics are particular and requires extra interpretation to process. This makes it hard for people who don’t get it to read, which is why subcultures like it. It is also hard to remember, which is most why password users would rather not use it.

Free letter-number and letter-symbol substitution combinatorially expands the possible number of ways of saying the same word, so a subculture discourse becomes less search-engine searchable: many people are spelling “owned” in a dozen or a hundred slightly different ways, occasionally using a consistent misspelling based on their specific message board / forum / niche. For an insular or underground subculture, this is a feature of 1337 - it opens up language to regional inflection and accent, which brings with it the potential for more shibboleth’s that expose outsiders. For password memorizers, of course, tiny seemingly-insignificant variations in the basic sense of a word or phrase are pure poison - they exploit the gap between what a symbol string is remembered for (its sense) and what it actually is, leading to more forgetting and failure.

I’ll go on at some other time, but you get the idea. I think IM often gets represented purely as a kind of subversive misspelling, the way people discuss the politics of ebonics grammar patterns. Efficiency is also part of the picture, but I wonder whether or not privacy and security aren’t at least as important - and in that sense, whether the culture of 13375p34|< and corporate mainframe security best practices might be mirrors rather than antitheses.

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Jeremy Douglass Mark, I stumbled into talking about 1337 aesthetics in the middle of a symposium talk on password aesthetics this summer. ... Mark, I stumbled into talking about 1337 aesthetics in the middle of a symposium talk on password aesthetics this summer. ...

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